Exploding the 10,000 hours myth – it’s no guarantee for greatness

Swedish psychologist K. Anders Ericsson has studied elite performers in music, chess and sport for decades, and he says the main distinguishing characteristic of experts is the amount of deliberate practice they’ve invested – typically over 10,000 hours.

This is painstaking practice performed for the sole purpose of improving one’s skill level. Best-selling authors like Gladwell, Daniel Pink, Matthew Syed and others, have taken Ericsson’s results and distilled them into the uplifting message that genius is grounded almost entirely in hard work.

But now a team led by David Hambrick have published a forceful challenge to the 10,000 myth. “We found that deliberate practice does not account for all, nearly all, or even most variance in [elite music or chess] performance,” they write.

click: http://digest.bps.org.uk/2014/06/exploding-10000-hours-myth-its-no.html

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Author: Allick Delancy

WE ALL HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO DO GREAT THINGS IN LIFE! The areas of education, psychology, motivation, behavioural coaching, management of stress, anger and conflict, has always interested Allick Delancy. For this reason, over the years he has conducted research in these fields and has experienced great success in writing, lecturing and assisting other persons to develop their fullest potentials. He has obtained a Bachelors of Science in Behavioural Sciences with an emphasis in Psychology and Sociology. Allick Delancy also earned a Masters of Arts degree in Educational Psychology, with general emphasis in Learning, Development, Testing and Research from Andrews University. He has worked in the field of community mediation, education--conducting life skills training (for students, teachers and parents), as well as conducting Functional Behavioural Assessments and developing Functional Behavioural Plans. He also lectures at the Bachelors degree level in Early Childhood and Family Studies, Leadership and Management and co-wrote an undergraduate course in social work.

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