Use of a stopwatch: The inattentive child.

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The stimulated mind of a child: The impact of environmental factors on behaviour.

A number of students are referred to me exhibiting signs related to behavioural and emotional challenges. More times than not, I will see clients who are moderate to severe in their behaviours. So we’re talking about students who are involved in disruptive behaviours or illicit activities, atypical behaviours, and consistent violators of school policies. To be more specific, these are children who were referred to the multidisciplinary team, for the following issues at school and at home:

  • verbally abusive
  • fighting with fist and weapons
  • uncontrollable sudden outbursts of anger
  • vandalism
  • constant stealing
  • excessive lying
  • drugs and alcohol abuse etc.

Generally, I will begin with a Functional Behavioural Assessment (FBA) on the student.  This will include a number of observations, interviews with teachers, parents and the student, along with checking reports from other stakeholders.  The objective is to get as much information as possible.

Over the years I have come to notice that behavioural or emotional challenges do not always exist in isolation (in this case only in one particular setting), but, sometimes their expressions do.

Some years ago, after graduate school, as I was starting off as a psychologist working with children with emotional and behavioural disorders, at the time I did not realise there was so much more I had to learn.  I remember taking the approach that clients will be consistent in their behaviours, regardless of the environment they were placed in. But human beings are not like programmed robots.  For instance, if we install software on our laptops, then regardless of where we are in the world, it should work the same.  So, if I take my laptop to Europe, Africa, United States or the Caribbean, when the icon for Microsoft Office Word is clicked, the program will open.  People should be the same, right?  No!  This approach will be so wrong.

Behaviour is affected biochemically, but environmental factors (or lack of specific ones) around us, also influences our reactions or expressions.

It is therefore very important, that to reduce or to completely eradicate an unwanted behaviour, we look at things which maybe contributing as fuel to the behaviour.  When this is identified, we should manipulate it to modify the behaviour.

Now, the understanding that children are affected by their environment has vital importance on the way they learn as well. For this reason, as an educational psychologist working with teachers and students, I encourage teachers to create an environment with things that acts as positive stimuli. These positive stimuli may include:

  • posters,
  • a library,
  • multimedia,
  • adequate space for group work and other social interactions,
  • proper lighting and temperature,
  • and a reasonably outfitted soundproofed room etc.

What are some additional features you believe can be used to act as positive stimuli to our children learning?

6 Powerful Habits For Success: Achieve Your Goals, Live That Dream And Add More Meaning To Your Life.

The objective of this book is to assist you to develop habits that promote success in your life. You will be able to now condition your mind and put together strategies to make you successful.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1: Life with Expectations
Chapter 2: History of the Problem
Chapter 3: Preparing For Action
Chapter 4: Six (6) Habits of Successful People
Chapter 5: How To Keep Going When Forming Useful Habits Get Tough.

School Tips Only Smart Students Use.: Here Are Their Top Secrets!

Admit it, failing at anything in school does not feel good!
It can damage your self-esteem, make you lose interest in educational pursuits and to see yourself as a failure.
I want to help you with exactly what must be done, to put you in a position to perform at your highest potential at school.
Learning can be fun and very rewarding. When your self-esteem is improved, you are placed in a position where you want to replicate your performance.

This is a straight forward student’s guide to a quick turnaround to educational success. Inside you will find exercises and questions for reflection.

Topic include:
Set goals.
Getting organized.
Prepare your physical area to study.
Use a stop watch or wall clock.
Do not procrastinate.
Always have confidence in yourself.
Helping others to examine themselves.
Calendar
Time table.
Journaling
Planning for each day of school.

The Scientific 4-Step Process to Become World-Class at Anything

By Benjamin P. Hardy

If you want to become world-class at what you do, you must get to the point where it becomes unconscious and automatic.
IMAGE: Getty Images

Learning new things engages your prefrontal cortex, which operates via your working (i.e., short-term) memory. Your working memory is used for conscious decision-making and planning, directed at the attainment of your goals.

However, once you automatize a skill, it becomes subconscious; and thus, you free up by 90 percent your working memory, which allows higher-level functioning. For example, you can drive for minutes at a time without even thinking about driving.

In the context of learning and performance, automaticity allows you to apply and deepen your learning in novel and enhanced ways. Developing automaticity is the process of going from doing to being–empowering you to become an expert and innovator.

As Josh Waitzkin, author of The Art of Learning, has said, “Just as the yin-yang symbol possesses a kernel of light in the dark, and of dark in the light, creative leaps are grounded in a technical foundation.”

Here’s how it works.

1. Repetition!

Whatever we plant in our subconscious mind and nourish with repetition and emotion will one day become a reality. –Earl Nightingale

The first step toward automaticity is repetitiously learning small sets or bits of information. If you’re learning a new language, it’s repeatedly hammering the same word types and roots. If you’re golfing, it’s practicing the same shot over and over.

However, automaticity goes beyond the initial point of mastery, to what has been called overlearning. To overlearn, you continue practicing and honing long after you know something inside-out.

Becoming grounded and proficient in the left-brained technical rules and skills frees up your right brain to creatively break or manipulate the rules.  As the Dali Lama has said, “Learn the rules well so you know how to break them properly.”

2. Find your zone and stay there as long as you can.

“The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in combat.”―Richard Marcinko

The second step toward automaticity is making the practice or training progressively harder. If you’re at the gym, increase the weight and intensity. If you’re giving a speech, include elements outside your comfort zone.

The goal is making the task increasingly difficult until it’s too hard. Then you drop the difficulty back down slightly to stay near the zone or threshold of your current ability.

3. Add a time constraint.

The third step toward automaticity is making the training more difficult while adding a time restraint. Do the same activity (e.g., writing an article), but give yourself a shortened timeline to do it in. Your focus should be process, not outcome on this. Quality over quantity.

Adding a timeline forces you to work faster while at the same time it requires you to think about the time, which loads up your working memory (think Chopped on Food Network).

4. Load up your working memory with purposeful distractions.

“In the midst of chaos, there is also opportunity”–Sun Tzu

The final step toward automaticity is working/training with an increasing memory load. In other words, doing the task with greater levels of distraction. Math teachers leverage this strategy by having students learning an obscure fact and having them recall it immediately after completing a math problem.

Eventually, you can perform the activity in a flowlike state, where the external distractions and pressures no longer influence your unconscious ability to act.

Conclusion

Watching our 8-year-old foster son learn how to read is teaching me a lot about the development of automaticity. For months, he did everything he could to avoid reading. Yet, we were persistent in working with him.

Eventually, he developed confidence himself and began to see the utility of reading, and his motivation shifted from extrinsic to intrinsic. Now we have a difficult time stopping him from reading.

If you want to become world-class at what you do, you must get to the point where it becomes unconscious and automatic. Once you get to this level, you’ll be able to innovate and make your craft your own, because you’ll be operating at a higher frequency.

Original Post: http://www.inc.com/benjamin-p-hardy/the-scientific-4-step-process-to-become-world-class-at-anything.html

Stop Failing! 11 tips to be the smartest in class now!: A straight forward student’s guide to a quick turnaround to educational success.

11

https://www.amazon.com/Stop-Failing-tips-smartest-class-ebook/dp/B01JMHU69Q/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

The Scientific 4-Step Process to Become World-Class at Anything

By Benjamin P. Hardy

If you want to become world-class at what you do, you must get to the point where it becomes unconscious and automatic.
IMAGE: Getty Images

Learning new things engages your prefrontal cortex, which operates via your working (i.e., short-term) memory. Your working memory is used for conscious decision-making and planning, directed at the attainment of your goals.

However, once you automatize a skill, it becomes subconscious; and thus, you free up by 90 percent your working memory, which allows higher-level functioning. For example, you can drive for minutes at a time without even thinking about driving.

In the context of learning and performance, automaticity allows you to apply and deepen your learning in novel and enhanced ways. Developing automaticity is the process of going from doing to being–empowering you to become an expert and innovator.

As Josh Waitzkin, author of The Art of Learning, has said, “Just as the yin-yang symbol possesses a kernel of light in the dark, and of dark in the light, creative leaps are grounded in a technical foundation.”

Here’s how it works.

1. Repetition!

Whatever we plant in our subconscious mind and nourish with repetition and emotion will one day become a reality. –Earl Nightingale

The first step toward automaticity is repetitiously learning small sets or bits of information. If you’re learning a new language, it’s repeatedly hammering the same word types and roots. If you’re golfing, it’s practicing the same shot over and over.

However, automaticity goes beyond the initial point of mastery, to what has been called overlearning. To overlearn, you continue practicing and honing long after you know something inside-out.

Becoming grounded and proficient in the left-brained technical rules and skills frees up your right brain to creatively break or manipulate the rules.  As the Dali Lama has said, “Learn the rules well so you know how to break them properly.”

2. Find your zone and stay there as long as you can.

“The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in combat.”―Richard Marcinko

The second step toward automaticity is making the practice or training progressively harder. If you’re at the gym, increase the weight and intensity. If you’re giving a speech, include elements outside your comfort zone.

The goal is making the task increasingly difficult until it’s too hard. Then you drop the difficulty back down slightly to stay near the zone or threshold of your current ability.

3. Add a time constraint.

The third step toward automaticity is making the training more difficult while adding a time restraint. Do the same activity (e.g., writing an article), but give yourself a shortened timeline to do it in. Your focus should be process, not outcome on this. Quality over quantity.

Adding a timeline forces you to work faster while at the same time it requires you to think about the time, which loads up your working memory (think Chopped on Food Network).

4. Load up your working memory with purposeful distractions.

“In the midst of chaos, there is also opportunity”–Sun Tzu

The final step toward automaticity is working/training with an increasing memory load. In other words, doing the task with greater levels of distraction. Math teachers leverage this strategy by having students learning an obscure fact and having them recall it immediately after completing a math problem.

Eventually, you can perform the activity in a flowlike state, where the external distractions and pressures no longer influence your unconscious ability to act.

Conclusion

Watching our 8-year-old foster son learn how to read is teaching me a lot about the development of automaticity. For months, he did everything he could to avoid reading. Yet, we were persistent in working with him.

Eventually, he developed confidence himself and began to see the utility of reading, and his motivation shifted from extrinsic to intrinsic. Now we have a difficult time stopping him from reading.

If you want to become world-class at what you do, you must get to the point where it becomes unconscious and automatic. Once you get to this level, you’ll be able to innovate and make your craft your own, because you’ll be operating at a higher frequency.

Original Post: http://www.inc.com/benjamin-p-hardy/the-scientific-4-step-process-to-become-world-class-at-anything.html

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