Children need reasons and direction to engage task

Many years ago, it probably was easier for an adult to say to a child ‘do this, or do that’. And what happened? The child engaged the task, without even asking, why? But children are at an early age engaging in discovery learning and critical thinking; they are inquisitive. It is true, children still go through the various stages in thinking and development, but being exposed to various media, as well as socialization that take place, they are encouraged to question and to explore different ways of thinking.
What adults are finding is that children no longer simply do as they are told but seek reasons as to why they should engage a specific task.
In some task, because of a lack of experience not all children can engage successfully, unless they receive direction. It is therefore left to their parents or/ and teachers to offer the necessary rationale for why they should engage a specific task and also offer the necessary directions to complete the task successfully.
Stay tuned as today’s podcast discuss this.

Stop Bad Behavior Creating Healing For Challenging and Bizarre Children Part 2

Encouraging Better Behavior When Your Child Acts Out

STEPS TO EXCELLENCE.

Encouraging Better Behavior When Your Child Acts Out

by

How to help a child who is acting out by setting clear, kind limits and offering positive guidance.

Walking out of school, I noticed my son had an envelope in his hand. As he handed it to me with a shy but determined smile he said: “Mom, this is for you. I wrote you an an apology letter. I was so angry and I am really, really sorry for what I said this morning.”

Just a few hours earlier we had had an unusually challenging morning. Where normally everyone follows a routine, we chat over breakfast and get ready for school and work without much fuss, this morning was so different. It was tense and so very trying. There was eye rolling, frowns and demands. It all culminated in an ugly, disconnected argument.

Emotions ran high.
Anger showed up big time for my son.
Words rattled many feelings.

Growing up…

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OCD: Symptoms, Signs & Risk Factors

Written by Ann Pietrangelo

OCD: Symptoms, Signs & Risk Factors

We all double or triple check something on occasion. We forget if we’ve locked the door or wonder if we’ve left the water running, and we want to be certain. Some of us are perfectionists, so we go over our work several times to make sure it’s right. That’s not abnormal behavior. But if you have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), you feel compelled to act out certain rituals repeatedly, even if you don’t want to — and even if it complicates your life unnecessarily.

Obsessions are the worrisome thoughts that cause anxiety. Compulsions are the behaviors you use to relieve that anxiety.

Signs and Symptoms of OCD

Signs of OCD usually become apparent in childhood or early adulthood. It tends to begin slowly and become more intense as you mature. For many people, symptoms come and go, but it’s usually a lifelong problem. In severe cases, it has a profound impact on quality of life. Without treatment, it can become quite disabling.

Some common obsessions associated with OCD include:

  • anxiety about germs and dirt, or fear of contamination
  • need for symmetry and order
  • concern that your thoughts or compulsions will harm others, feeling you can keep other people safe by performing certain rituals
  • worry about discarding things of little or no value
  • disturbing thoughts or images about yourself or others

Some of the behaviors that stem from these obsessive thoughts include:

  • excessive hand washing, repetitive showering, unnecessary household cleaning
  • continually arranging and reordering things to get them just right
  • checking the same things over and over even though you know you’ve already checked them
  • hoarding unnecessary material possessions like old newspapers and used wrapping paper rather than throwing them away
  • counting or repeating a particular word or phrase. Performing a ritual like having to touch something a certain number of times or take a particular number of steps
  • focusing on positive thoughts to combat the bad thoughts

Social Signs: What to Look For

Some people with OCD manage to mask their behaviors so they’re less obvious. For others, social situations trigger compulsions. Some things you might notice in a person with OCD:

  • raw hands from too much hand washing
  • fear of shaking hands or touching things in public
  • avoidance of certain situations that trigger obsessive thoughts
  • intense anxiety when things are not orderly or symmetrical
  • need to check the same things over and over
  • constant need for reassurance
  • inability to break routine
  • counting for no reason or repeating the same word, phrase, or action
  • at least an hour each day is spent on unwanted thoughts or rituals
  • having trouble getting to work on time or keeping to a schedule due to rituals

Since OCD often begins in childhood, teachers may be the first to notice signs in school. A child who is compelled to count, for instance, may not be able to complete the ritual. The stress can cause angry outbursts and other misbehaviors. One who is afraid of germs may be fearful of playing with other children. A child with OCD may fear they are crazy. Obsessions and compulsions can interfere with schoolwork and lead to poor academic performance.

Children with OCD may have trouble expressing themselves. They may be inflexible and upset when plans change. Their discomfort in social situations can make it difficult to make friends and maintain friendships. In an attempt to mask their compulsions, children with OCD may withdraw socially. Isolation increases the risk for depression.

Risk Factors and Complications

The cause of OCD is not known. It seems to run in families, but there may be environmental factors involved. Most of the time, symptoms of OCD occur before age 25.

If you have OCD, you’re also at increased risk of other anxiety disorders, including major depression and social phobias.

Just because you like things a certain way or arrange your spice rack in alphabetical order, it doesn’t mean you have OCD. However, if obsessive thoughts or ritualistic behavior feels out of your control or are interfering with your life, it’s time to seek treatment.

Treatment usually involves psychotherapy, behavioral modification therapy, or psychiatric medications, alone or in combination. According to Harvard Medical School, with treatment, approximately 10 percent of patients fully recover and about half of patients show some improvement.

Original post: http://www.healthline.com/health/ocd/social-signs

Helping Students Start the School Year With a Positive Mindset

by: Maurice J. Elias’s Profile

Boy happily running with his backpack

For students who have had trouble in school, or who have had a negative summer, it is especially important to get the school year off to a fresh start. And for all students, having a positive mindset makes learning much more likely. Here are four activities to help accomplish these goals.

Identity and Purpose: Who Am I?

Now that students are back in school, it’s a good time to help them refocus on learning, their strengths, and the personal and other resources that will help them succeed. Students can individually fill out the grid below, and then pair-share, discuss in small groups, and finally share with the class some of their responses. (Students tend to be most comfortable sharing numbers 2, 4, and 6 below when in larger groups.)

You may also wish to use other creative forms of sharing, such as having students create a collage or chart with all of their answers to each question or the top three answers to each question. Consider integrating this activity into any journal writing your students do.

  1. What motivates me?
  2. What are my best abilities?
  3. How do peers influence me?
  4. When and with whom am I at my best?
  5. Who are my best sources of help?
  6. How can I do more of what will best help me to succeed?

A Living Poll

Read each statement and, based on students’ opinions, have them move to a part of the room that you designate to represent each of the answers below. The three areas of the room are for those who believe any of these three answers:

  • It’s mostly true for me.
  • It’s partly true and not true.
  • It’s mostly not true for me.

You can choose to present the following questions positively or negatively:

  1. “I think school is pointless.” OR “I think school is important, and I need to learn so that I can succeed.”
  2. “I can be violent in some situations.” OR “I am more peaceful and would only use violence where there is a real danger.”
  3. “I think that trying doesn’t matter.” OR “I believe that the more I try, the more I can succeed.”
  4. “I do what makes me popular with others in school.” OR “I do what I want and what I think is the right thing to do.”
  5. “I come to class to pass the time.” OR “I am someone who wants to be involved in school and learn.”

After each statement (or others that you may wish to add), ask students in each area of the room to share why they believe as they do. There is great value in students hearing peers’ views about why they have turned to a more positive mindset. And it’s instructive for the teacher to get a sense of students’ views. Note that students may move to an area where they “think” that the teacher wants them to be.

Asking them to articulate why they believe as they do is your check — and their reality check — on whether they really do have the belief that they’ve endorsed. You may want to end with a discussion of the challenges of sharing honest opinions.

Journaling About Beliefs and Mindset

As a supplement to the above or as an activity in its own right, have students respond in their journals to at least one of each stem:

  • I used to be _______ but now I am _______
  • I used to think _______ but now I think _______
  • I used to do _______ but now I do _______

There is added benefit to revisiting these activities mid-year, or even after each marking period, to see how ideas are changing (positively or negatively).

Make a Good First Impression

First impressions matter. Teachers have told me the importance of decorating classrooms in ways that catch students’ attention and gives them something to think about at the same time. Give your students clipboards and a questionnaire asking them to notice different aspects of how the room is decorated. Come together to discuss what differences students noticed, why they think you made those choices, and what they would add if they were you. You can adapt this for younger children, as well.

Share with us in the comments section below your experiences with these activities and especially your more effective adaptations.

Post: http://www.edutopia.org/blog/helping-students-start-year-positive-mindset-maurice-elias?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=socialflow

12 Daily Hacks To Stay Motivated During Challenging Times

12 Daily Hacks To Stay Motivated During Challenging Times

by Tyler Basu

Success never comes easy. No matter what your goal is, you can expect to face challenges as you pursue it.

It takes motivation to keep going when things get tough. This is why those who are the most motivated often become the most successful.

Here are 12 steps you can do daily to help you stay motivated when things get tough:

1. Display your goals on your wall

Put your goals in writing, and put them on a wall where you will see them often. On a whiteboard in your home or office (or both) is ideal. Review your goals every morning and every night, and glance at them as often as you can throughout the day. If you’re a visual person, you may find it effective to use pictures. For example, a picture of your dream car or a vacation destination you want to go to on. Remember, if your goals don’t excite you and challenge you, they probably aren’t big enough. It may be time to create some new ones.

 

2. Write down your priorities for the day first thing in the morning

One of the first things you should do every morning is sit down and make a list of the important activities you need to complete for the day. List them in order of priority, and then get started on the most important one first (especially if it’s the most difficult one). A huge mistake most people make is not managing their time and prioritizing their activities for the day. Instead, they spend the day responding to everything that is thrown at them. Instead of being proactive about what they need to accomplish, they become reactive to the needs of everyone else.

 

3. Listen to inspiring audio content

Throughout the day there are plenty of opportunities to listen to something positive. You can listen to something when you’re cooking, cleaning the house, driving your car, exercising at the gym, or jogging around your neighborhood, just to name a few. Download the audio version of some of your favorite books, or subscribe to a few podcasts about your favorite subjects. Listening to 30-60 minutes per day of educational or inspiring audio content will have a tremendous impact on your life and productivity in the long run.

“People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.” – Zig Ziglar

4. Read before you go to sleep

A great way to unwind at the end of a long day is to read a few pages of something positive and educational before you go to sleep. Doing this also helps to take your mind off of any problems or challenges you encountered during the day. After you’ve read a few pages, take a few minutes to reflect on what you just learned, and think of at least one action step you can take immediately to better handle any issues or challenges you are currently dealing with.

 

5. Do not allow yourself to complain

At any given moment, you can have a positive attitude or a negative attitude. There isn’t much of a grey area in between the two. Refusing to allow yourself to complain will pretty much eliminate you ever having a negative attitude. This simple trick basically forces you to remain positive and optimistic. Whenever you catch yourself about to complain about something, stop yourself and think of something you’re grateful for instead.

 

6. Get an accountability partner

A daily or even a weekly call with a close friend or associate has proven to be an effective way to stay on track for many people. Keep it brief. The purpose of these calls is to check in and confirm that your partner is staying focused and is still on track to achieving whatever their goals are at the time. Whether it’s exercising regularly, prospecting for new business, working on a specific project, the purpose of the call is to hold them accountable to their commitments. You do it for them, and they do it for you. It works both ways.

 

7. Don’t sweat the small stuff

Want to know some of the secrets to happiness? Here they are: Don’t worry about things you can’t control. Don’t major in minor things. Choose your battles wisely. Don’t argue over small things. If something is truly important to you, give it your attention. If it’s not, let it go. Sometimes it’s more important to be happy than to be right.

 

 

8. Spend more time with positive people (and less time with negative ones)

Pay more attention to who you allow to be around you. Spend your time with people who are positive, and who encourage your success. Minimize the amount of time you spend with people who are constantly complaining or being negative. You can’t change negative people, but they will change you if you hang around them long enough.

“Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.” – George S. Patton

9. Recite positive affirmations

Positive affirmations are statements that you recite aloud.  Create a list of positive statements that reflect the values, ideals, and beliefs you want to develop and/or uphold. Whenever you’re feeling frustrated or lacking confidence, take a moment to recite your affirmations. It may seem corny, but it works. Think of it as conditioning your mind for success.

 

 

10. Reward yourself for making progress

Never forget to reward yourself for making progress. Break your large goals into smaller milestones, and each time you accomplish one of those milestones, celebrate. It doesn’t have to be a big celebration, just make sure you do something. Every success (yes, even a small one) is worth celebrating. It is often a series of small successes that pave the way for the big ones. If you only celebrate the big ones, you may go prolonged periods of time without celebrating anything, and this can have a negative impact on your motivation. Incremental progress is still progress. Give yourself the recognition you deserve.

 

11. Look for the opportunity in every problem

Practice being the person who can find the hidden advantage in every seemingly negative situation. While everyone else focuses on the problem, stay focused on finding a solution. As Napoleon Hill once said: “Every failure, every adversity, every heartache carries with it the seed of an equal or greater benefit.” Always look for the benefit.

“Failure will never overtake me if my determination to succeed is strong enough.” – Og Mandino

12. Know what you’re fighting for

The last hack for staying motivated through challenging times is to always know what you’re fighting for. Whenever you are faced with a challenge, your mind will demand a reason for your suffering. You better have a crystal clear response, because if you don’t, your mind will convince you to quit. We all have 2 voices in our head. One voice says “This is too hard. This is uncomfortable. I should quit.” The other says “Yes this is challenging, but it will be worth it. Keep going.”  You need to give that second voice a reason to speak up. Why are you doing what you’re doing? Make a list of your reasons and never forget them.

12 Daily Hacks To Stay Motivated During Challenging Times