Activities for Children With Behavioral Problems

by Jennifer Zimmerman, Demand Media

Behavioral problems have many causes. They can stem from neurological disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, emotional issues such as abuse or family issues such as divorce. Regardless of the cause, though, some activities can help children with behavioral problems. Parents and teachers will need to determine which activities are most appropriate for a specific child.

Exercise

No activities can eliminate behavior problems, but some can reduce the likelihood of them occurring. Exercise is recommended by both Kids Health and the American Academy of Pediatrics for help with behavioral problems. For children whose behavior problems have to do with anger, Kids Health recommends martial arts, wrestling and running as especially helpful forms of exercise.

Role-playing

Lack of self-control is often a cause of behavior problems, so the National Association of School Psychologists has suggested activities to help teach self-control. One idea is to use puppets to role-play wanting something that you can’t have. The organization suggests having your child write or draw something he’d like to do, then discussing it and sharing something you’d like to do, but can’t. Next, you and your child can use puppets to role-play scenarios that are typically frustrating for children such as wanting a toy that another child has or wanting to play with a friend who isn’t available. After acting out the scenarios, you and your child should discuss how he felt and what choices he made during the exercise.

Reading Aloud

Reading to your children is more than just an opportunity to settle down at bedtime and increase literacy skills; it can also be an opportunity to practice identifying feelings. Children who struggle to identify feelings, whether their own or others can have behavior problems. The National Association of School Psychologists suggests parents discuss character’s feelings with their children while they read and encourage children to draw pictures to illustrate those feelings.

Teach Problem-solving

Sometimes children misbehave because they don’t know how to handle a circumstance or a feeling correctly, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. The National Association of School Psychologists suggests teaching children to deal with feeling angry. Have them recognize that they are angry by identifying characteristics such as clenched hands, then have them count to 10, then have them think about their choices. Discuss choices such as walking away, taking deep breaths or telling the person how you feel in a calm voice. Finally, children should act on their best choice.

 

Click here for original article: http://everydaylife.globalpost.com/activities-children-behavioral-problems-5099.html

How to Get Kids To Listen Without Yelling

…When promises, pleading and threats no longer work, yelling can feel like the only option. Especially if time is short, behaviors are out of bounds, and big power struggles break out  yelling becomes the go to way to get kids to start listening.  

The problem is that yelling at kids really doesn’t help them focus on what you want them to do.  Katie Hurley, parenting educator explains why this backfires:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here for the original article: http://www.positiveparentingconnection.net/how-to-get-kids-to-listen-without-yelling/

Parenting the modern child

Do you want to communicate with your children, have them listen to you or follow instructions easier? Millions of parents and teachers around the world are saying yes to this question. If you say yes too, then this podcast is for you.
We live in a world that is very much modern. There are so much we have available to us that can assist in making us effective. Parenting, in order to be effective today, must also be done using modern or up-to-date strategies. Listen to this podcast and learn some of them.
Remember to subscribe, like, and share this content if you think it was meaningful.

How to Address Children with Challenging Behaviors in an Early Childhood Environment (EC-4)

Learn how to address challenging behaviors in early childhood settings (EC-4) by Brenda Armstrong for Gulf Coast Community Services Association (GCCSA) Teachers. These techniques can be applied at home as well.

6 Powerful Habits For Success: Achieve Your Goals, Live That Dream And Add More Meaning To Your Life.

The objective of this book is to assist you to develop habits that promote success in your life. You will be able to now condition your mind and put together strategies to make you successful.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1: Life with Expectations
Chapter 2: History of the Problem
Chapter 3: Preparing For Action
Chapter 4: Six (6) Habits of Successful People
Chapter 5: How To Keep Going When Forming Useful Habits Get Tough.