Research Is In: The Real Impact of Class Size and School Diversity Answers to common questions parents have about kindergarten.

By Youki Terada
Does Class Size Matter?

When evaluating schools, the first thing parents often look at is the class size, or number of students being taught in a particular classroom. Yet while smaller classes can be beneficial for students, research suggests that it’s not guaranteed.

A 2014 analysis by the National Education Policy Center found that smaller classes generally lead to higher test scores for students—especially in earlier grades and for students from disadvantaged backgrounds—but only if teachers are properly trained and adjust their instruction accordingly.

For example, in smaller classes teachers can tailor instruction to meet students’ specific needs, or spend less time on classroom management and more time on activities that engage students and improve learning opportunities. If teachers make these kinds of adjustments, smaller classes can yield positive results.

Despite these benefits, smaller class sizes may not be cost-effective compared with other improvements. Studies show that highly trained, well-supported teachers in large classes can be just as effective as less-experienced teachers in smaller classes. In a 2015 report titled What Doesn’t Work in Education: The Politics of Distraction, Professor John Hattie concludes that decreasing class size yields only a small net improvement in learning because teachers rarely alter their teaching style when moving from a larger to smaller class.

The takeaway: While smaller classes may be beneficial for students, don’t assume that they guarantee positive results. You should look for high-quality, experienced teachers first and foremost—even if they are teaching in large classes.

Entire article: https://www.edutopia.org/article/choosing-kindergarten-what-does-research-say-youki-terada

 

IEP: Students Benefit When We Collaborate Tips for both parents and teachers to improve collaboration around creating individualized education programs.

By Katherine Koch
How Can Teachers Improve Collaboration?

First and foremost, remember to be kind, listen to (not just hear) what parents have to say, and don’t judge them or their decisions. Parents are sharing with us the most precious thing they have, and we often, in our haste to stay on time with the meeting schedule, may forget that and focus on the difficulties the child is having and how we intend to identify and fix them—a deficit model. Instead, remember to acknowledge the child’s strengths and positive qualities, focusing on what they do well and how you plan to build on those strengths while still addressing areas in which they need additional support.

Original article:https://www.edutopia.org/blog/improving-collaboration-iep-table-katherine-koch

The iceberg of life: Helping children understand others.

It is vital that children be taught how to demonstrate respect for other persons. It is also of importance that children learn how to identify types of verbal, emotional and physical responses displayed. This podcast touches on the importance of these as well as tips on how to teach a young child or adolescent.

Reflective Practice for Persons Interacting with Children

Reflective Practice for Persons Interacting with Children: regardless of where you live in the world, reflection can benefit you. With today’s challenges of interacting with children—getting them to listen to what you have to say and following direction—it is vital that we have the necessary skills to reach them. This podcast episode looks at how reflective practice can assist you as a parent or teacher in communicating effectively; listening and giving effective feedback.

Parents are part of the child’s life too!

Children can benefit from the collaborated efforts of parents and school teachers. When parents are not part of the decision making process of education in the classroom, they can feel isolated. It is also critical that feedback on the student’s positive performance be shared with parents and not just negative ones.
This episode of the podcast looks at some practical ways to bridge the gap between parents and teachers.

Parent Involvement Matters!

Parent involvement in a child’s life is so important.  For the child to become a positive person and truly educated in life (as it relates to how to behave or conduct themselves), they need to be made aware.  The same is true when looking at how parenting affects the child in the school system.  So the encouragement is to continue to be a positive parent to your child and give them the opportunity to truly live.

All parents should be informed: Do You Know What’s Going on in Your Student’s Classroom?

Gary Direnfeld, MSW, RSW

When an Educational Assistant gets injured, odds are it was witnessed by multiple students. What are students seeing and experiencing in today’s classroom? Beyond the violence, what else is affecting students in the classroom? Here is what EAs want all parents to know:

Unbeknownst to the public, Educational Assistants (EAs) suffer the greatest number of lost time injuries (LTIs) out of the top ten occupations were injuries are sustained. An LTI is a workplace injury that results in a loss of time from the workplace. As you can imagine that means the injury has to be significant enough so as to take the worker out of the workplace. The length of time out of the workplace can be as little as a day up to including those persons who would qualify for long term disability. In other words, these are not simple bruises or scrapes.

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In addition to LTIs, Educations…

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