6 Powerful Habits For Success: Achieve Your Goals, Live That Dream And Add More Meaning To Your Life.

The objective of this book is to assist you to develop habits that promote success in your life. You will be able to now condition your mind and put together strategies to make you successful.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1: Life with Expectations
Chapter 2: History of the Problem
Chapter 3: Preparing For Action
Chapter 4: Six (6) Habits of Successful People
Chapter 5: How To Keep Going When Forming Useful Habits Get Tough.

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The Scientific 4-Step Process to Become World-Class at Anything

By Benjamin P. Hardy

If you want to become world-class at what you do, you must get to the point where it becomes unconscious and automatic.
IMAGE: Getty Images

Learning new things engages your prefrontal cortex, which operates via your working (i.e., short-term) memory. Your working memory is used for conscious decision-making and planning, directed at the attainment of your goals.

However, once you automatize a skill, it becomes subconscious; and thus, you free up by 90 percent your working memory, which allows higher-level functioning. For example, you can drive for minutes at a time without even thinking about driving.

In the context of learning and performance, automaticity allows you to apply and deepen your learning in novel and enhanced ways. Developing automaticity is the process of going from doing to being–empowering you to become an expert and innovator.

As Josh Waitzkin, author of The Art of Learning, has said, “Just as the yin-yang symbol possesses a kernel of light in the dark, and of dark in the light, creative leaps are grounded in a technical foundation.”

Here’s how it works.

1. Repetition!

Whatever we plant in our subconscious mind and nourish with repetition and emotion will one day become a reality. –Earl Nightingale

The first step toward automaticity is repetitiously learning small sets or bits of information. If you’re learning a new language, it’s repeatedly hammering the same word types and roots. If you’re golfing, it’s practicing the same shot over and over.

However, automaticity goes beyond the initial point of mastery, to what has been called overlearning. To overlearn, you continue practicing and honing long after you know something inside-out.

Becoming grounded and proficient in the left-brained technical rules and skills frees up your right brain to creatively break or manipulate the rules.  As the Dali Lama has said, “Learn the rules well so you know how to break them properly.”

2. Find your zone and stay there as long as you can.

“The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in combat.”―Richard Marcinko

The second step toward automaticity is making the practice or training progressively harder. If you’re at the gym, increase the weight and intensity. If you’re giving a speech, include elements outside your comfort zone.

The goal is making the task increasingly difficult until it’s too hard. Then you drop the difficulty back down slightly to stay near the zone or threshold of your current ability.

3. Add a time constraint.

The third step toward automaticity is making the training more difficult while adding a time restraint. Do the same activity (e.g., writing an article), but give yourself a shortened timeline to do it in. Your focus should be process, not outcome on this. Quality over quantity.

Adding a timeline forces you to work faster while at the same time it requires you to think about the time, which loads up your working memory (think Chopped on Food Network).

4. Load up your working memory with purposeful distractions.

“In the midst of chaos, there is also opportunity”–Sun Tzu

The final step toward automaticity is working/training with an increasing memory load. In other words, doing the task with greater levels of distraction. Math teachers leverage this strategy by having students learning an obscure fact and having them recall it immediately after completing a math problem.

Eventually, you can perform the activity in a flowlike state, where the external distractions and pressures no longer influence your unconscious ability to act.

Conclusion

Watching our 8-year-old foster son learn how to read is teaching me a lot about the development of automaticity. For months, he did everything he could to avoid reading. Yet, we were persistent in working with him.

Eventually, he developed confidence himself and began to see the utility of reading, and his motivation shifted from extrinsic to intrinsic. Now we have a difficult time stopping him from reading.

If you want to become world-class at what you do, you must get to the point where it becomes unconscious and automatic. Once you get to this level, you’ll be able to innovate and make your craft your own, because you’ll be operating at a higher frequency.

Original Post: http://www.inc.com/benjamin-p-hardy/the-scientific-4-step-process-to-become-world-class-at-anything.html

I Challenge You To Be Better.: Knowing Yourself, Becoming A Friend Of Journaling & Self Evaluation.

I believe that in spite of all that is going on in the world; in your community, in your home for instance, it is possible for you to live a more meaningful life.
Whatever you choose to do in your life that is positive, can move from just being an idea in your head to becoming a reality.
So, what do you want for yourself? Do you want to become a better father or mother, student, athlete, business person or spiritually minded person for example.
I want you to read through this book and truly find value from the information that is placed within.
I challenge you to be better because I know you can.

…you could accomplish all you want too, all on your own.

With the world becoming more and more individualistic, achievement is promoted as a lonely process. This kind of thinking is far from the truth. I made mentioned above, that for everything we do, eat, wear for instance, it was made possible because of someone else.

While it is true that your goals, and at least achieving them depends significantly on you, it will be erroneous to think that you can achieve these solo.

Any good student in life knows, that learning takes place by someone showing or by you the student observing. So, even if you look at it in this broad way, you no doubt get the picture that even in the case of observation learning, you need someone else.

Some persons are of the view, that to share their talents, time and wisdom with others will take too much time away from them.  They see what they are working on as too important to stop and lend a hand. So, opting not to assist in coaching others to realize their dreams, they focus on theirs.

Not only is this selfish, but in preventing someone else, or maybe not preventing but not contributing to the success of others, they may be inadvertently preventing their true success.

On the one hand, when we stopped to assist others we develop qualities such as love and compassion.

Imagine if a mother was working and being a better appearance but failed to assist another who probably was younger at parenting. This person would have missed valuable lessons which can actually make her better at parenting.

Think for a moment an entrepreneur, who was so focus on developing a personal brand and did not assisting another to develop theirs, can actually sully a relationship which could have developed. This is so as many businesses depend on collaboration and networking to survive in today’s competitive markets.

Then there are others who are very much skeptical, believing that if they share their ideas with others, they will be stolen. While it is true that there are some who can be very unscrupulous, sharing ideas of persons puts you in a good position to receive feedback.

To make any product better feedback is important. To know if you are working on yourself, and becoming a better person, feedback is also important. So the idea here is to put yourself or your dreams before others to examine. The positive critique you receive will be very valuable on your way forward.

For other, they feel that if they ask for assistance, they will be viewed as weak.  And this is a major problem.

A person venturing out into something new will make mistakes. They will not have all the answers and so they will be vulnerable. But vulnerability should not be seen as a problem; at least it should not be looked at as one. Again, this provides an opportunity to receive feedback and produce something of greater value.

 

From: 6 Powerful Habits For Success: Achieve Your Goals, Live That Dream And Add More Meaning To Your Life.

Copyright © 2017 Allick Delancy

All rights reserved.

5 Soft Skills to Teach This Year

With our continued shift to a technology driven society, few days go by that I don’t have a conversation with someone concerned about “today’s kids’ ” lack of “Soft Skills.” As the mother of 2 of these aptly named “GEN Z” babies…I can understand the worry. As an adult who has simply adapted to the culture, not grown up in it, I often find myself buried in my mobile phone rather than having an actual conversation. I’ve even recently learned a “wear your ear buds to avoid conversation” trick when I’m exhausted…from my twelve year old.

Yet soft skills remain some of the most important things employers look for when hiring according to the Jobs Can Blog https://www.jobscan.co/blog/top-resume-skills-for-2016-2/  .  As educators our job is to ensure our students are prepared for success when they leave our classrooms/schools. I wholeheartedly believe a HUGE portion of this success will increasing revolve around how well our schools teach students soft skills.

Here are 5 Soft Skills that are currently the “Most Often Looked for by Employers” (Jobs Can Blog) and some suggestions on how to incorporate them into your classrooms/schools this year:

1) TEAMWORK:

  • Working together toward a common goal.
  • Functioning successfully in different team roles
  • Putting the “Team’s Success” before personal success

Classroom/School Translation

Admittedly, I was a student who cringed when the teacher would say we were “working in groups.” I would end up doing the entire project/assignment myself due to my Type A personality (among other things)! There was NO Teamwork in these groups.

Thankfully, today I can say I have seen group work done so well I would’ve asked for it when I was a student! The key to this awesome group work I’ve been has been 1) Assigning roles to each team member (which changes with each assignment/project) 2) Clear expectations of the duties to be performed by the student assigned each role 3) A system of checks/balances in place to ensure the group is functioning as a TEAM with each student staying on task with their role. GROUP WORK IS GREAT…but it takes A LOT of work on the front end to establish norms, systems, and behavioral expectations to make “Groups” into functioning TEAMS! Teaching successfully in groups is one of the more masterful arts of our profession.

Another outstanding way to promote teamwork in your school is to encourage participation in an activity, club, or sport school-wide. (For example- Many schools require all entering Freshman to participate in at least one activity.) Increased social activities along with the group activities/teamwork are great ways to build soft skills in even the most introverted student. These can be done during an “activity” period in the day, during excess lunch or recess time, or even after school (if that’s the only option).

         2) Decision-Making

  • Making a choice based on evidence gathered
  • Being definitive…based on goals

Classroom/School Translation

Allowing students to choose from a variety of assignment types to show mastery of a skill is a great way to cause students to begin to critically examine their individual decision-making. Instead of “just doing what my friend does” students begin to look at what they would really prefer to do or what allows them to show they have mastered the skill in the most efficient (fastest and best) way.

Another example is providing students “student voice” within the school. Give them spots on committees and other duties that require responsibility. This demands a huge amount of decision-making; 1) are they willing to do it 2) decisions they have to make through the process This is a great way of giving students a “window” into the world of the adults in the school.

Soft Skills MATTER!

Soft Skills MATTER!

3) Communication

  • Talking face to face, making eye-contact while speaking, understanding social norms in various situations
  • Appropriately using Social Media for communication

Classroom/School Translation

Modeling appropriate ways to communicate can go a long way. Educators must assume students are not being taught these skills at home (most are not). Assignments that require interviewing adults, peer-to-peer questioning, and other communication via non-technology means (no emails please!) are great assignments for this. Make sure you do not assume students know how to do properly do this (they usually don’t); provide live examples for them.

Telephone (land line & cell) conversation etiquette is something that needs to be taught. What you should or should not say, text, or post to social media is a very important piece of information that can impact your students’ futures long after their lives in school.

As a school why not train students to greet visitors and give tours. No better way of learning communication skills than actually putting them to use in an important setting.

 

4) Planning & Prioritizing

  • Scheduling for optimum production over time
  • Doing what is most urgent first then following with items in order of importance

Classroom/School Translation

Educators have a great opportunity to scaffold students’ abilities to plan & prioritize. Long-term goals provided at the beginning of a class that have multiple components and will not be due until far into the term are a perfect example.

For younger students, allowing them to prioritize what needs to be done first in a project versus giving them step-by-step directions is a great way of building students’ prioritizing skills.

As a school it’s important to plan and prioritize and your students can be part of this. Student leaders can maintain an activity schedule they create among the different clubs and activities in conjunction with school administration. Along with planning and prioritization…this also requires the other soft skills we’ve already discussed.

5) Research Skills

  • Finding information from a variety of sources
  • Ensuring information is truthful & meets actual research needs
  • Ability to cite research

Classroom/School Translation

Long gone are the days of the card catalogue and the bound encyclopedia from our students’ research repertoire. Teachers are now responsible for instructing students on how to navigate “the Web” for their research needs.

Students must understand the difference between a credible source on the Web and one that may not be credible as well as where to go to find each. Along with this tall task we also must make sure our students understand the importance of citing works and how-to do this when using electronic sources. Thankfully, there have been several tools created to make this simpler.

As a school, moving to e-portfolios that require students to keep a sampling of their work for each term (with various different specifications for different schools) makes great sense. A requirement like this would not only provide evidence your students had appropriate research skills and were applying them in their classroom; it would also show the growth of these skills over time.

Post:http://daisydyerduerr.com/5-soft-skills-to-teach-this-year/

Stop Bad Behavior Creating Healing For Challenging and Bizarre Children Part 2

Stop Failing! 11 tips to be the smartest in class now!: A straight forward student’s guide to a quick turnaround to educational success.

11

https://www.amazon.com/Stop-Failing-tips-smartest-class-ebook/dp/B01JMHU69Q/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

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