Understanding self harm: Why young people self harm and how they can recover.

More and more the world is becoming a difficult place for young people to live in. This is so as youths are confronted with pressure to perform highly on school examinations, deal with complex relationships, experience body changes, bullying and general uncertainties which come with entering adulthood. In some communities there are increases in the number of young person’s engaging in self harm/self injurious behaviors. It is important therefore, that these children be given the opportunity to learn more positive coping mechanisms as they combat feelings of loneliness, low self-esteem and mental health issues.

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InBrief: The Science of Neglect

Extensive biological and developmental research shows significant neglect—the ongoing disruption or significant absence of caregiver responsiveness—can cause more lasting harm to a young child’s development than overt physical abuse, including subsequent cognitive delays, impairments in executive functioning, and disruptions of the body’s stress response. This edition of the InBrief series explains why significant deprivation is so harmful in the earliest years of life and why effective interventions are likely to pay significant dividends in better long-term outcomes in learning, health, and parenting of the next generation.

This 6-minute video provides an overview of The Science of Neglect: The Persistent Absence of Responsive Care Disrupts the Developing Brain, a Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child.

Creating Rules in the Home for a Successful Family.

Ever had a situation in the home when you just don’t know what to do?  Maybe it has to do with your children not cleaning up after themselves or playing football in the dining area instead of outside.  Or perhaps they got up each morning on the weekend, and all they did from the start of the day to late evening is look at television, played video games or talk on the cell phone with their friends.

Oh, there we go all hands are raise.

Come on, you know you want to raise your hands.  Ah, that’s it, there we go!

Well, there is nothing simple about getting your children to do chores or go read a story book or something like that when they want to do the total opposite.  But here is something you could try to modify the behaviour of your children.

Use written rules.

  1. Be clear: If the rule is for the child to pick up their toys after playing with it in the play area, then it needs to say so.  By saying move your toys could mean to the child, kick your toys to the corner of the room in a heap.  So the written rule should speak to where you want them to put their toys and how they should arrange them as well.
  2. All must be following rules: Children learn by association, social learning, observing for instance.  If parents also have some written rules for themselves, then when the child observes the parent adhering to these, they will be more incline to follow the ones they have.
  3. Involve the child in developing rules: As adults, we all want to know that we are a part of something that pertains to us. Children are no different.  When you are making the rule for your home get their contributions.  They may think of something that you may not have thought about if you are creating the rules for them.  So get their views.
  4. Put rules in a place all can see: It is important that the children be able to have the visual benefit of the rules you make with them. So put it on a sheet of flip chart paper or wide enough so it can be easily seen by all.

So use rules in the home to see your family start building positive habits, or use these rules to reinforce what can be build upon.

Stop Bad Behavior Creating Healing For Challenging and Bizarre Children Part 2